History

History

Department staff:

Mr H. Richards: Subject Leader

Mrs K. Potts: Assistant Subject Leader

Mr J. Crabtree: House Progress Leader, (Subject Leader of Politics 2016-7)

Mrs K. Wood: Subject Leader of Politics (Maternity leave from September 2016)

Miss E. Townsend

Mr N. Bradley

Mr C. Hardwell: Director of Sixth Form

Key Stage 3: History

Overview of the course

Using some of the most intriguing subjects from the histories of Britain, Europe and the world, students will extend their knowledge and understanding of the past to help them make sense of the wider world they live in. Students will use their historical study to create structured and well-evidenced responses to key enquiry questions, developing their own lines of argument and coming to individual conclusions. They will also develop key skills in areas such as critical thinking and evaluation of evidence to establish what they do and do not believe about the past.

What will I learn?

Year 7

What was Britain like before the Normans?

Why did William the Conqueror triumph in 1066?

How did the Norman Conquest change Britain?

Does King John deserve his reputation?

Rats or Rebels: Was the Peasants Revolt more significant than the Black Death?

How can historians learn about the Wars of the Roses?

Year 8

Which event was most significant on Britain’s path towards democracy from 1605 to 1888?

Why did people move from superstitious to scientific ideas?

How and why do historians disagree about the effect of the British Empire?

How can we use historical evidence to learn about the Transatlantic Slave Trade?

How far did conditions for people in York improve between 1500 and 1900?

Year 9

Why was the Great War significant?

Why did women win the vote in Britain between 1890 and 1918?

How and why have historians disagreed about the events of World War 2?

How can historical evidence help us explore the complexities of the Holocaust?

Passport to GCSE: how has Britain and Europe changed in the last thousand years?

What will I do?

  • Study a wide range of topics, people, places and events from the past;
  • Learn to evaluate the reliability and usefulness of different sources of evidence;
  • Develop convincing written arguments;
  • Explain why and how things happened;
  • Debate and discuss;
  • Come to well-informed judgements about the past

Key Stage 4: History

GCSE History (From September 2015)

Overview of the course

Students will explore issues related to the 20th century world, with a focus on Britain, Europe and the wider world. By studying History students will develop the following skills:

  • Building strong knowledge and understanding of events in the past
  • Being able to explain and evaluate the causes and consequences of historical events
  • Developing a grasp of change and continuity over time
  • Assessing the significance of key individuals and events
  • Evaluating the usefulness and reliability of historical evidence
  • Communicating your ideas clearly both verbally and in writing

Students will cover the following content:

  • Britain during the era of WW1 – Liberal Welfare Reforms, Votes for Women and the Homefront during WW1 (Paper 2)
  • The USA 1919-1941 (Paper 1)
  • The Causes of the Cold War, 1945-1949 (Paper 1)
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis (Paper 1)
  • The Vietnam War (Paper 1)
  • Civil Rights in America, 1945-75 (Controlled Assessment)

Assessment details

25% Controlled Assessment, 75% examinations

Examination board: OCR History B: Modern World

Useful Subject Links:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse-history-b-modern-world-j418-from-2013/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/mwh/ (ensure focus on relevant topics)

Key Stage 4: History

GCSE History (From September 2016)

Overview of the course

Students will explore the history of local sites, Britain, Europe and the wider world. History students will develop:

  • Strong knowledge and understanding of events in the past;
  • The ability to explain and evaluate the causes and consequences of historical events;
  • A sound understanding of changes and continuities over long periods of time;
  • The ability to accurately assess the significance of key individuals, events, sites and changes;
  • The skills to evaluate the usefulness and reliability of historical evidence;
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

Students will cover the following content:

  • The People’s Health, 1250 to the present;
  • The Norman Conquest, 1065-1087;
  • A site study of Fountains Abbey;
  • The Making of America, 1789-1900;
  • Living under Nazi rule, 1933-1945.

Assessment details

Paper 1: The People’s Health and the Norman Conquest – 40%

Paper 2: Fountains Abbey – 20%

Paper 3: The Making of American and Nazi Germany – 40%

Examination board: OCR History B: Schools History Project

Useful Subject Links:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse-history-b-schools-history-project-j411-from-2016/